West Bloomfield Township Public Library
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Friends in Our World - LGBTQ+ Friends (Kids)

Fiction books featuring LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender) characters.

The best at it by Pancholy, Maulik

Twelve-year-old Rahul Kapoor, an Indian-American boy growing up in small-town Indiana, struggles to come to terms with his identity, including that he may be gay.

Middle school's a drag : you better werk! by Howard, Greg (Gregory Steven)

In Charleston, South Carolina, a young business entrepreneur, newly out as gay, starts his own junior talent agency and signs a thirteen-year-old aspiring drag queen as his first client.

Zenobia July by Bunker, Lisa

Zenobia July, an excellent coder and hacker, investigates a mystery while wrestling with the challenges of a new school, a new family, and presenting her true gender for the first time.

Julián is a mermaid by Love, Jessica

While riding the subway home from the pool with his abuela one day, Julián notices three women spectacularly dressed up. Their hair billows in brilliant hues, their dresses end in fishtails, and their joy fills the train car. When Julián gets home, daydreaming of the magic he's seen, all he can think about is dressing up just like the ladies in his own fabulous mermaid costume: a butter-yellow curtain for his tail, the fronds of a potted fern for his headdress. But what will Abuela think about the mess he makes -- and even more importantly, what will she think about how Julián sees himself?

Julian at the Wedding by Love, Jessica/ Love

Julián and his abuela are going to a wedding. Better yet, Julián is in the wedding. Weddings have flowers and kissing and dancing and cake. And this wedding also has a new friend named Marisol. It’s not long before Julián and Marisol set off for some magic and mischief of their own, and when things take an unexpected turn, the pair learns that everything is easier with a good friend by your side. Jessica Love returns with a joyful story of friendship and individuality in this radiant follow-up to Julián Is a Mermaid.

When Aidan became a brother by Lukoff, Kyle

"Aidan, a transgender boy, experiences complicated emotions as he and his parents prepare for the arrival of a new baby"--

Harriet gets carried away by Sima, Jessie

While shopping with her two dads for supplies for her birthday party, Harriet, who is wearing a penguin costume, is carried away by a waddle of penguins and must hatch a plan in order to get herself back to the store in the city.

Genius Jolene by Cassidy, Sara

Eight-year-old Jolene enjoys a long road trip with her truck driver father, as she does every year, but this year it is different because her parents have separated and her father is with another man.

Jack (not Jackie) by Silverman, Erica

Susan loves her baby sister, Jackie, but as Jackie grows older and behaves more and more like a boy Susan must adjust to having a brother, Jack, instead.

Auntie Uncle : Drag Queen Hero by Royce, Ellie/ Chambers

Told from the perspective of their adoring nephew, Auntie Uncle: Drag Queen Hero is the story of a courageous drag queen who saves the day, and brings two communities together.

My rainbow by Neal, DeShanna

"A dedicated mom puts love into action as she creates the perfect rainbow-colored wig for her transgender daughter, based on the real-life experience of mother-daughter advocate duo Trinity and DeShanna Neal"--

My two moms and me by Joosten, Michael

Families with same-sex parents are celebrated in this board book that follows busy moms and their kids throughout their day—eating breakfast, going on a playdate, heading to the pool for a swim, and settling back in at night with a bedtime story and a good-night lullaby. LGBTQ+ parents and their friends and families will welcome this inclusive and cheerful book that reflects their own lives and family makeup.

My two dads and me by Joosten, Michael

An adorable board book for the babies and toddlers of gay fathers, featuring a variety of diverse, loving families with two dads.

The Whispers by Howard, Greg (Gregory Steven)

"Eleven-year-old Riley's mom has disappeared and Riley knows that if he leaves tributes for the Whispers, magical fairies that grant wishes, his mom will come back to him"--

The Pants Project by Clarke, Cat

Eleven-year-old Liv fights to change the middle school dress code requiring girls to wear a skirt and, along the way, finds the courage to tell his moms he is meant to be a boy.

The list of things that will not change by Stead, Rebecca

Despite her parents' divorce, her father's coming out as gay, and his plans to marry his boyfriend, ten-year-old Bea is reassured by her parents' unconditional love, excited about getting a stepsister, and haunted by something she did last summer at her father's lake house.

To Night Owl from Dogfish by Sloan, Holly Goldberg

Unhappy about being sent to the same summer camp after their fathers start dating, Bett and Avery, eleven, eventually begin scheming to get the couple back together after a break-up. Told entirely through emails.

Lily and Dunkin by Gephart, Donna

"Lily Jo McGrother, born Timothy McGrother, is a girl. But being a girl is not so easy when you look like a boy. Especially when you're in the eighth-grade. Norbert Dorfman, nicknamed Dunkin Dorfman, is bipolar and has just moved from the New Jersey townhe's called home for the past thirteen years. This would be hard enough, but the fact that he is also hiding from a painful secret makes it even worse. One summer morning, Lily Jo McGrother meets Dunkin Dorfman, and their lives forever change"--

The Name I Call Myself by Namir, Hasan/ John

Meet Ari, a young person who doesn’t like to be called by their birth name Edward: “When I think of the name Edward, I imagine old kings who snore a lot.” Throughout this beautiful and engaging picture book, we watch Ari grow up before our very eyes as they navigate the ins and outs of their gender identity; we see how, as a child, they prefer dolls and princess movies, and want to grow out their hair, though their father insists on cutting it short, “because that’s what boys look like.” At nine, they play hockey but wish they could try on their mother’s dresses; at fifteen, they shave their face, hoping to have smooth skin like girls. At sixteen, they want to run away, especially from their father who insists, “You’re a boy, so you have to act like one.” Who will Ari become? Moving from age six to adolescence, The Name I Call Myself touchingly depicts Edward’s tender, solitary gender journey to Ari: a new life distinguished and made meaningful by self-acceptance and unconditional love. Ages 5 to 12.
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